Featured

    Featured

  • QUIZES

  • QUESTIONS

  • SLOLVED QUESTIONS

  • HIGHER EDUCATIONAL INFO

  • PDF FREE

  • PLEASE SUBSCRIBE

  • NEW PDF BOOKS UPDATED

Structural chemistry or stereochemistry

Structural chemistry or stereochemistry is the science of the structures of chemical compounds,
the latter term being used mainly when the structures of molecules are concerned.
Structural chemistry deals with the elucidation and description of the spatial order of atoms
in a compound, with the explanation of the reasons that lead to this order, and with the
properties resulting therefrom. It also includes the systematic ordering of the recognized
structure types and the disclosure of relationships among them.
Structural chemistry is an essential part of modern chemistry in theory and practice. To
understand the processes taking place during a chemical reaction and to render it possible
to design experiments for the synthesis of new compounds, a knowledge of the structures
of the compounds involved is essential. Chemical and physical properties of a substance
can only be understood when its structure is known. The enormous influence that the
structure of a material has on its properties can be seen by the comparison of graphite
and diamond: both consist only of carbon, and yet they differ widely in their physical and
chemical properties.
The most important experimental task in structural chemistry is the structure determination.
It is mainly performed by X-ray diffraction from single crystals; further methods
include X-ray diffraction from crystalline powders and neutron diffraction from single
crystals and powders. Structure determination is the analytical aspect of structural chemistry;
the usual result is a static model. The elucidation of the spatial rearrangements of
atoms during a chemical reaction is much less accessible experimentally. Reaction mechanisms
deal with this aspect of structural chemistry in the chemistry of molecules. Topotaxy
is concerned with chemical processes in solids, in which structural relations exist between
the orientation of educts and products. Neither dynamic aspects of this kind are subjects
of this book, nor the experimental methods for the preparation of solids, to grow crystals
or to determine structures.
Crystals are distinguished by the regular, periodic order of their components. In the
following we will focus much attention on this order. However, this should not lead to
the impression of a perfect order. Real crystals contain numerous faults, their number increasing
with temperature. Atoms can be missing or misplaced, and dislocations and other
imperfections can occur. These faults can have an enormous influence on the properties of
a material.
author

DESH DEEPAK A P S CHAUHAN

M.Sc. CHEMISTRY!

Get Free Email Updates to your Inbox!

www.chemistryabc.com

Like Our Facebook page

Translate

Total Pageviews

Copyright © ChemistryABC | Designed By chemistryabc.com